Flannel(ish) Friday: Alpha-gator

30 Aug

So there I was, casually perusing the Flannel Friday pinterest board on “animals” looking for some new ideas, and I came across this post by Miss Tara.  I was immediately inspired to make my own alphabet-eating alligator. I thought ever-so-briefly about cutting a hole in my alligator puppet’s mouth (NOT advised) and then started thinking of other ways to create my own alpha-gator.  I thought about HOW LONG it would take me to cut out all of those letters and that I wanted to use my gator next week. What’s the solution? MAGNET LETTERS. I have some I got from the Target dollar section (can I get three cheers for the Target dollar section?) and haven’t been able to use them yet.

My first attempt at a 3D gator was an unmitigated disaster. Two cardboard tubes covered in green felt, with one end cut to look like an alligator mouth, ended up looking like a snake with a weight problem who had been left in the dryer while wet. So I went 2D.

Here’s my gator and letters:

gator

The gator is laminated and has magnets stuck on the back. My plan is to stick him on a cookie sheet (I’ve ordered a magnet/white board from Lakeshore) and then, as he eats each letter, stick them on his tummy. I like that the kids will still be able to see the letters, as the shapes are referenced in the poem.  There are a few too many letters so they’ll have to be piled up a bit.

Now, this is still a work in progress because I’ve discovered that my letters don’t have very strong magnets. I’ve also ordered some of those via Lakeshore in hopes they’ll be better. If they aren’t, well, I’ll have to re-think this whole shebang.

Hope the Alpha-gator’s hungry!

The Library Lady is hosting our round-up today. To see all past flannels, visit the pinterest page via the icon to the right.

Happy flanneling!

Hats and Hair Storytime

8 Aug

I mentioned in my last Flannel Friday post (over a month ago…eeek!) that I was creating this storytime after reading Super Hair-o and the Barber of Doom. It went over pretty well with the preschoolers, so it’s time to share.

I have a bunch of assorted hats sitting in a drawer in my office (as you do) so I brought some of them along and put on a different one for each story. And there were some GREAT stories!:

  • Rocco, Jon. Super Hair-o and the Barber of Doom. Jon thinks his wild, curly super hair-ohair is the source of his super powers. But when the barber cuts it all off, what will he do to regain his powers?
  • Klassen, Jon. I Want My Hat Back. Bear goes looking for his hat. Nobody has seen it. Or HAVE they?
  • Game: “Who Wears This Hat?”: I printed out some pictures of various hats (cowboy, hard hat, astronaut helmet, firefighter hat, etc.) and covered with clear contact paper. I held them up and the kids helped me figure out who wears each hat, and what job they do.
  • Agee, Jon. Milo’s Hat Trick. Milo the magician HAS to improve his show with a hat trick. He goes looking for a rabbit, but instead finds a bear with an impressive skill.
  • Flannelboard: “My Hat It Has Three Corners
  • Lita Judge. The Red Hat. Sort of a wordless picture book – the only words are sounds (but OH WHAT AWESOME SOUNDS!). A bear cub pulls a child’s red hat off a clothesline and begins a game of chase with his animal friends, resulting in the hat unraveling.

Other books I like:

I tip my cap to you, storytimers. What are your favorite hat/hair books?

 

 

 

Photo Friday?

2 Aug

Alas, I have no Flannel Friday post today. Just haven’t made any new flannels lately, and we’ve been busy ’round these parts with lots of (good) changes. I have several storytime plans I need to write up for y’all, and will get to those ASAP.

However, in the meantime, I give you….

Cat. Napping on Ukulele.

Image

 

Flannel Friday: My Hat It Has Three Corners

28 Jun

This week I read John Rocco’s Super Hair-o and the Barber of Doom and was inspired to create a hair-themed storytime. But when I wasn’t able to find as many stories as I liked, I expanded the theme to include hats. Ah. NOW we’ve got a good storytime!

I poked around (with a very long stick) the Flannel Friday pinterest page and saw Mollie’s version of “My Hat it Has Three Corners” and was immediately inspired.  See, when I was very little, my family lived in Germany while my father was on an exchange scientist program through the USAF. And this song was one of the ones I learned to sing in German (and one of the few that I remember): Mein Hut, der hat drei Ecken, Drei Ecken hat mein hut. Und hätt er nicht drei Ecken, so wär es nicht mein Hut. So I HAD to make a flannelboard!

hat

(the word corners going around the corner was unintentional. I ran out of space. But I like it!)

My hat, it has three corners

Three corners has my hat.

If my hat had not three corners,

It would not be my hat!

(Tune)

Now here’s the extra fun part: When you sing it, you do actions when you say these words: Hat (tap head), Three (hold up 3 fingers), Corners (tap elbow). Sing it once, doing all the motions and saying all the words. Then turn over the hat picture and sing again, but DO NOT say hat. Just tap your head. Sing a third time with hat and three turned over, and do not say those words but keep doing the actions. For the final time, turn over hat, three, and corners, and sing without saying those words. FUN!

Today’s roundup is hosted by Bridget.  To see all the flannels, check out our pinterest page by clicking the icon to the right!

Happy flanneling!

Flannel Friday (WHAT!? A Post? REALLY?): Watermelon Contest

14 Jun

Hey! Long time no blog! Yes, I realize it’s been 3 MONTHS since my last post. I apologize for neglecting this blog; I plead busyness. I’ve been busy with a bunch of projects, some of which I will post about here, soon, and haven’t made any new flannelboards or felt inspired to write on anything else.  I promise I’ll do better. PLEASE don’t break up with me!

This flannel is a result of reading Greg Pizzoli’s new story The Watermelon Seed and feeling inspired to create a “summer foods” storytime. You know, all those things we like to eat especially in summer? Hot dogs, popsicles, ice cream, watermelon. If you haven’t read Greg’s book, DO IT NOW. It’s delightful, and accurate. I know I worried about things growing in my belly when I was a kid.

I found this on Making Learning Fun:

(tune: London Bridge is Falling Down)

Find the largest watermelon, watermelon, watermelon

Find the largest watermelon at the fair.

Give it a blue ribbon, blue ribbon, blue ribbon

Give the largest watermelon a blue ribbon.

watermelon

I made 5 watermelon and 5 ribbons, so 5 kids at a time can come up and award prizes to the largest, next largest, etc. I think I would switch it up and perhaps ask the kids to award the first place to the smallest, next smallest, etc. Maybe I’ll make strange shaped watermelon and ask them to award prizes to the squarest, silliest, etc.. Endless possibilities!

watermelon2

The roundup today will be hosted by Katherine.  Check out all past flannels via our pinterest page (click the icon on the right sidebar).

Happy flanneling!

(Happy 2nd Anniversary) Flannel Friday: Rhyming Pairs

15 Mar

First of all: HAPPY 2ND ANNIVERSARY, FLANNEL FRIDAY! Can you believe it’s been MORE THAN 2 years since Melissa at Mel’s Desk posted her first flannelboard and promised to make it a regular Friday event? And 2 years since our first round-up? Wow. What a great couple of years it’s been, and how many GREAT ideas have been shared and connections made.

This flannelboard is inspired by a couple I saw on pinterest as I was perusing the “rhymes” board looking for something new to use in my rhyming stories-themed storytime. I liked LQ’s Little Green Bug on a Rug (got me thinking about “bug on a rug” and other rhyming pairs) and Sharon’s “Clap Your Lap” with its big words showing ending sounds.  I thought it might be fun to make pictures of more of these pairs of words and have the kids figure out what they were – say the rhyming words – while adding the words to the pictures to add the print connection. Y’all know HOW MUCH I like putting words on my flannels.

As I started thinking about the pairs I wanted to use, I knew I didn’t have the time or inclination to make ALL of them out of felt. So, I went the google image route. I’m not going to share the pictures I found with you (COPYRIGHT!), but trust me, if you google image search each of the phrases below, you will find some EXCELLENT and FUNNY examples*. I added decorative frames around each picture (clipart I purchased from etsy here), put the words on, covered in contact paper, added a velcro dot to the back, and voilá! Rhyming pairs pictures.  I will show the pics to the kids and ask them to describe what they see. Then I will point out the words on the bottom: “Yes! It’s a cat in a hat!”

Not the Dr. Seuss version.

Not the Dr. Seuss version.

The phrases I used are:

Pup in a Cup

Bug on a Rug

Frog on a Log

Moose with a Goose

Mouse in a House

Pig in a Wig

Ted [Teddy Bear] in the Bed

Sunny Bunny [bunny in sunglasses]

Bee in a Tree

Snake on a Lake

Mouse in a House

Sheep Asleep

Owl in a Towel [the first pic that comes up in image search is my MOST FAVORITE PICTURE OF ALL TIME]

*I can share the Cat in the Hat picture because that’s my own kitty, gettin’ her snooze on, with a little hat I added in MS Word. Feel free to use it for your own rhyming pairs pictures:

There was NO WAY I was getting her to wear a REAL hat.

There was NO WAY I was getting her to wear a REAL hat.

Today’s anniversary round-up is hosted by our most excellent founder, Melissa! Check there later for all the flannelly goodness, and click on the icon to the right to visit our pinterest page. Also, if you want to see where in the world your fellow flannel friday friends (ooh, nice alliteration!) are, check out this cool map that Anne, Mollie and Amy created! Add yourself if you’re not there!

Happy flanneling!

Ukulele in Storytime: Sleeping Bunnies

10 Mar

Hi! Welcome to another installment of watch Mary make a fool of herself ukulele in storytime! Today we’re learning “Sleeping Bunnies,” a song I first heard on Kathy Reid-Naiman’s cd “Tickles and Tunes.”  It’s super easy to play on uke, and SUPER fun for the kids! When they start hopping, the storytime rug becomes a preschool mosh pit!

Happy playing!

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